Friday, June 8, 2007

Cellulostic Ethanol Action Alert

The Forest Landowners Association has issued the following Action Alert. If you support wood, (instead of corn) as a base for ethanol production, now would be a good time to let your Senators know. --Brian
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Special Issue June 7, 2007
Forest Landowners Association Action Alert
Contact Your U.S. Senator Today
The Forest Landowners Association is excited about the federal movement to promote cellulostic ethanol as a renewable energy source for our country, which will benefit the almost 11 million non-industrial forest landowners across the United States. Cellulostic ethanol is produced from natural feedstocks such as woody biomass, trees, and a variety of other plant materials.
We need your help!
Congress is developing energy legislation that will be voted on soon. We are pleased to report that due in part to recent FLA efforts, the Senate Energy Bill now has language that includes cellulostic ethanol as a means to help solve our nation's energy crisis and spur the development of bioenergy markets for forest landowners.
A few manufacturers fear this new market for forest products will create increased competition which could translate into them paying higher prices to landowners for their wood. They are working very hard to change this bill, and others, in order to limit the forestland eligible for these new markets. We need your help to make sure they don't succeed in excluding your forestland.
Why is this so important?
In an effort to reduce America's dependence on foreign oil, power our nation, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and diversify the nation's fuel supply, forest landowners can provide an alternative to fossil fuels by promoting, enabling, and utilizing all cellulostic biomasses.
New markets for woody biomass and other cellulostic feedstocks will improve forest health by reducing hazardous fuels, encouraging responsible forest management, and enhancing wildlife habitat. The use of wood for energy can sustain forestlands as desirable investments and stop forestland conversions to other uses. We value current markets, but forest landowners must have some assurance that there will be future markets for their investments in forestland. An unrestricted market in cellulostic biofuels is the best policy for forest landowners and renewable energy producers.


What to say to your Senator


  • Family forests can be part of the solution to America's energy needs and independence.

  • Trees are an abundant, renewable, and reliable energy source.

  • New markets for forest products will help landowners sustain the family forest.

  • A few manufacturers are proposing restrictive definitions of woody biomass in the energy bill and they want to limit competition for their raw products: trees.

  • Unrestricted markets are the best policy for forest landowners and renewable energy producers.


Call Today!
To contact a Senator's office, please call (202) 224-3121, ask for his/her office and then ask for the energy legislation assistant. Leave a voicemail message if you cannot speak directly to that person. Please be sure to contact your Senator by phone or fax as sending a letter takes too long and timing is important on this issue.

1 comment:

  1. http://i-r-squared.blogspot.com/2006/08/guest-post-on-cellulosic-ethanol.html

    "...it is perfectly possible to make ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass, it's just extraordinarily inefficient, with EROEI easily determined to be about 1:5."

    "Even ignoring, as most studies do, such major problems, and using available corn stover and enzymatic hydrolysis, the currently favored biomass resource and process, our techno-economic analysis estimated a cost of ethanol twice as high as that of ethanol from corn. Forest residues and wastes, biomass crops, and municipal wastes are even less promising."

    So, I should contact my senator about something that is technically feasible but nowhere near economically feasible? Should I also ask him to raise my taxes in order to subsidize it?

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